ECOWAS AND THE CONTROL OF ARMS TRAFFICKING:¬ IMPLICATION FOR REGIONAL SECURITY

Fortune Iringe-Miebaka

Abstract


The illicit arms conflicts rocking West African Sub-Region indicates large number of illicit arms have engulfed the Region despite there incessant unlawful use by the state and non-state actors. broad display of illicit arms to illegal actors in West African Regions create a huge threat higher than that of Covid-19 pandemic in terms of its human and social Economic effects, due to these illicit arms trafficking, the fabric of the Sub Region is drastically detourorating, swiftly drifting towards self-destruction This paper examined ECOWAS Convention and its role in the control of illicit arms in West African Region. Rational choice theory by Adams Smith formed the theoretical backing of the study. The study adopted descriptive method. Secondary sources of data were employed in this work, with the central method being library research, articles, textbooks and internet publications. Finding from the study show that there are more than one hundred million illicit arms in West African Region, which continually aggravate numerous of armed conflicts in the Sub Region, despite of the distinct efforts of ECOWAS to combat illicit arms trafficking in West Africa Sub Region. The paper further shown that ECOWAS Convention which intend to control the desterilizing and excessive build-up of illicit arms in the sub region is nothing but a fantasy  as an  upshot  of  feeble National control  and absence of international cooperation  on illicit arms  control that led to the trafficking of these arms  on illicit market. It was revealed that the utmost obstacle in resolving deliberations on gun policy in West African is inadequate data and political will among the state, thus, the paper concludes that, combating illicit arms and   transfer of arms to nefarious criminals, terrorist and combatant will entail a new approach with more defined objectives by ECOWAS member states.

Keywords


ECOWAS, Trafficking, Small Arms, Light Weapons and Regional Security

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